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okagami:

marypsue:

Kill the idea that naivety is an unforgivable flaw but cynicism is just wisdom, murder it, chop it up and serve it for dinner, I don’t care, just end this bullshit idea that it’s better to hate than to love and better to rot in miserable bitter resignation than to hope for the best.

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(via hopefulveterinarian)

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awwww-cute:

The 140 lb reason I come home from college

awwww-cute:

The 140 lb reason I come home from college

(via hopefulveterinarian)

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puszkin-san:

Beth Cavener Stichter

(via jackalsalad)

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Brain-melting:
http://ift.tt/1xgn9vK

Tags: IFTTT Facebook
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(Source: missisanfi, via prguitarman)

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(Source: ForGIFs.com, via urbanmongoose)

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canidcompendium:

The Fox and the Wolf: an Unlikely Duo 
by Brian Stallard
Scientists have found evidence that indicates that a resurgence of wolf populations in North America could be suppressing the dominance of coyote populations, allowing for red foxes to gain the upper hand in a long-observed rivalry.
According to a study published in the Journal of Animal Ecology, fur trapping records across North America indicate that red fox populations are on the rise where growing wolf populations are present.
For wolf-claimed regions such as Alaska, Yukon, Nova Scotia, and Maine, this data is demonstrating what researchers from the Oregon State University Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society are calling the “wolf effect.”
The wolf effect shows how the presence and absence of wolves in a region can affect two other primary predators, coyotes and red foxes.
Read more
Photo by Zechariah Judy

canidcompendium:

The Fox and the Wolf: an Unlikely Duo 

by Brian Stallard

Scientists have found evidence that indicates that a resurgence of wolf populations in North America could be suppressing the dominance of coyote populations, allowing for red foxes to gain the upper hand in a long-observed rivalry.

According to a study published in the Journal of Animal Ecology, fur trapping records across North America indicate that red fox populations are on the rise where growing wolf populations are present.

For wolf-claimed regions such as Alaska, Yukon, Nova Scotia, and Maine, this data is demonstrating what researchers from the Oregon State University Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society are calling the “wolf effect.”

The wolf effect shows how the presence and absence of wolves in a region can affect two other primary predators, coyotes and red foxes.

Read more

Photo by Zechariah Judy

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stablevertigo:

What I mean when I say “I can’t do that”- Anxiety Version:

  • I am unable to do that
  • I am too stressed out to do that
  • I cannot face the humiliation of attempting to do that
  • My body will physically not allow me to do that
  • I am on the verge of a panic attack
  • I can not do that

What people hear:

  • I am unwilling to do that
  • I am just shy
  • I am overreacting
  • I am lazy
  • I need to get more experience in social situations to help my anxiety
  • I need a push
  • I don’t want to do that

Inspired by X

(via walfsworld)

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Tags: BEEeeER!
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(Source: ricktimus, via fablefire)

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magicalnaturetour:

I Ain’t Hiding by blarrggg on Flickr.
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WHEN I REALIZE MY STIPEND BARELY COVERS MY RENT

whatshouldwecallgradschool:

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rhamphotheca:

In Search of Kenya’s Elusive Wild Dogs

by Elizabeth Pennisi

Most visitors to Africa come for the lions, elephants, and rhinos. But for the tourists who helicoptered into this somewhat remote region of central Kenya last month, wild dogs topped their list. Once so common in Africa that they were shot as vermin, the elusive canines are becoming poster children for conservation: Fewer than 7000 are left in Africa, their native range.

A reporter visiting the center, I love dogs and so jumped at the chance to track some down in advance of the tourists’ arrival. It was a dusty, bumpy ride into the bush, for a fleeting view of animals that aren’t really dogs after all. But along the way, I came to appreciate their incredible story.

They are full of wanderlust, and their packs show camaraderie and coordination to rival the best military unit. Yet they are quite vulnerable, and even though several teams of researchers have dedicated large chunks of their lives following these animals, much about them remains mysterious.

Despite the name, Lycaon pictus is a distant relative of household canines. Dogs, wolves, and coyotes can all interbreed but not with wild dogs, which are sometimes called painted wolves because of their colorful and variable coat patterns…

(read more: Science News/AAAS)

photos by Stefanie Strebel and Elizabeth Pennisi

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It is Southeast Texas levels of humid outside today and I do not miss this.

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seimsisk:

argentconflagration:

emilianadarling:

argentconflagration:

i made a thing

THIS IS RELEVANT TO MY INTERESTS.

#thank you for making this friend!!

you’re very welcome friend!

Whenever someone starts with “let me explain the difference betwenn bi and pan”, I brace myself for impact. I expect biphobic, panphobic, ignorant statements. But this time it didn’t happen. I’m glad.